PUMP it Louder...

PUMP it Louder...

A breast pump becomes an accessory for every breastfeeding Mum. Many new Mums are often left confused/unsure as to what to look for and that is after you navigate the mindfield of terminology and gadgets. So lets break down some information relating to breast pumps to give you the best start of where to look.

Pumping can have a way of making us human mamas feel a little like milk machines. 

Even if you plan to exclusively breastfeed (often referred to as "EBF"), it is helpful to have a breast pump on hand. Why? It can help to increase your milk supply, especially in those early days. Breast milk is produced on a supply and demand basis, so pumping for a few minutes after nursing or adding in a pumping session an hour or so after baby finished can up your supply. Some woman have attachment issues or their newborn has difficulty feeding, or they are placed in a neonatal unit so it becomes necessary for the Mum to pump to generate a supply.

Having some expressed breastmilk on hand can also mean that someone else can do the feed giving Mum a break through the night or alternative an escape during the day- a breast pump gives you the freedom to do so.

Of course, if you’re planning on breastfeeding after returning to work, you’ll want a breast pump so you can keep your supply up, have a stash in your home freezer and relieve engorgement when you’re at the office.

There are basically four types of breast pumps:

  1. Double-electric breast pumps: These powerful electric models let you pump both breasts at once, important if speed is a concern.
  2. Single-electric breast pumps: You’ll only be able to pump one breast at a time, which can take longer. On the plus side, these cost less than a double-electric pump.
  3. Battery-operated breast pumps: These can be slower and run through batteries pretty quickly. The advantage of a battery-operated pump is that they're portable and helpful if you don’t have access to an electrical outlet (such as when you’re commuting to work or traveling).
  4. Manual breast pumps: These are lightweight, portable and inexpensive. The downside? You'll be doing a lot of the work yourself and you may not get as much milk as a result.

So the decision then comes down to answering these questions in relation to the pump and financial outlay:

          • Manual vs electric
          • How many hours a week do you think you'll be pumping? 
          • Weight
          • Sound
          • Will you be pumping occasionally or regularly, short-term or long-term?
          • Quality versus price
          • Suction and speed control
          • Product support and Warranties
          • Nipple Size
          • Ease of cleaning

 

Here are a few options to consider:

Best Breast Pump Overall: Medela Pump in Style Advanced

Most Efficient Breast Pump: Spectra S1 Plus Hospital Strength Breast Pump

Best Budget-Friendly Breast Pump: BellaBaby Double Electric Breast Pump

Best Breast Pump for Travel: Medela Freestyle Flex

Most Comfortable Breast Pump: Philips Avent Comfort

Best Single-Electric Breast Pump: Nuk Expressive

Best Manual Breast Pump: Lansinoh Manual

Best Hands-Free Breast Pump: Willow Wearable Breast Pump

Best Breast Pump for EBF Moms: Haakaa Silicone Breast Pump

Quietest Breast Pump: Spectra S2

5 ways to steer yourself through procrastination

5 ways to steer yourself through procrastination

As a Mum, you have to juggle through a number of tasks every day. To you, every family member is like your child, whom you have to nourish and care for. So, you have loads of work to do every day and you frequently run out of time. But, do you ever wonder if there is something else contributing to your running out of time? How about procrastination? Maybe a yes or maybe a no, however, one thing is sure that you do wish to have a magic wand which could give you some extra time to finish your chores whenever you are falling short of time.

 

Now, here is good news for you as today we are going to give you the magic wand! Excited to know about the magic wand and how it works? So, let me disclose that you are yourself the magical wand, about whom we are talking about here. Don’t feel surprised! After all, you work wonders every day to keep your family happy despite falling short of time and that’s nothing short of magic! Thus, you have all the power and magic inside you only.

Now, let’s come straight to your problem of running short of time. So, Mum just do a little magic of honesty and introspectif you procrastinate? Your answer is most certainly yes because we all do! In fact, a little procrastination is okay.  But, when it starts preventing you from getting things done in time, it becomes problematic. In your attempt to do more in the less time left, you overexert yourself. Not only this, but your stress level also rises significantly, which is not at all good for you. Moreover, procrastination leads you to spend your whole day working for everyone else’s happiness but yours. You don’t find time for yourself.

Even when you are procrastinating on a task and relaxing on the couch,  you aren’t actually relaxing. In the back of your mind, you are still thinking about the dozens of pending tasks you have. So, it is crucial for you to steer yourself through procrastination. Now, let’s see how to do that:

1. Create your work schedule:

 

Yes, you have to create your work schedule. This has nothing to do with defining a fixed time for every task but at least you can fix the beginning and end of your work schedule. Let’s say that you can make it a routine to start working at 10 (after everyone has left for their destinations, work, school, etc.)and finish all your household chores by 3 or 4 in the afternoon. You can decide these limits according to your comfort level and the amount of work you have to do. Further, it is not compulsory to follow the same work schedule every day. Some days you might have some additional tasks to do like laundry. So, you can create a new work schedule for the new day every morning. Believe me, creating a work schedule will be really beneficial for you.  If you’ll have a fixed work schedule, you’ll be less likely to procrastinate and you’ll get everything done in time.  

2. Keep a check on yourself:

 

We all have our weaknesses and get carried away with them. For example, 5 minutes of Instagram often turns into an hour and we realize that only after we have lost plenty of our working time and you know what happens afterward! You work like a super speedy machine to get the things done before your children or family members return back home. Now, to get over this type of problem, you have to keep a constant check on yourself. If you feel the urge to use your favorite social media sites, go for it! But, not without setting a timer. You have to clearly set a limit on the time you’ll be devoting to your selected activity. Once the timer rings, just leave your smartphone right away and start working. This will help you get over procrastination to a large extent.

 

3. Set ‘No Procrastination’ reminders in your smartphone:

 

At times, you may forget all about overcoming procrastination. You may get drifted and start following your casual routine. So, it is always best to set ‘no procrastination’ reminders or alarms on your smartphone. You can set them to ring at regular intervals of time during your work schedule. For example, after every half an hour. This will help you not to get caught in the tight grip of procrastination.

 

4. Make use of the Pomodoro Technique:

 

Working continuously is definitely monotonous. This is one big reason why we procrastinate. So, if you break your work schedule into smaller segments, you’ll find it easy to overcome procrastination. Now, to break your work schedule into smaller segments, it is best to make use of the Pomodoro Technique. Given below are the simple steps by following which you can practice the Pomodoro Technique:

Select the task you want to do
Set a timer for 25 minutes
Start working in a focussed manner
Stop as soon as the timer rings
Take a break for 5 to 7 minutes
Get back to work after the break gets over
 
5. Allure yourself with exciting rewards:

When you are conscious that you are procrastinating, but still find it hard to get over it, then this is the best strategy to follow. You have to simply allure yourself with an exciting reward for completing the pending task. For example, you can give yourself a 30-minute relaxing nap as a reward, after completing your work schedule or you can cook your favorite snacks in the evening. These rewards will give you the power to overcome procrastination and focus your energy on work.

 

So magical Mum, now you know how to steer yourself through procrastination and not run out of time despite having to shoulder multiple responsibilities at home. Now, wishing you all the best and hoping that you’ll be able to set procrastination aside in your life.

 Written by 

Jessica Robinson
The Speaking Polymath
December 10, 2020 — Joanne Shepherd
Pregnancy and CoVid19 so what's the latest

Pregnancy and CoVid19 so what's the latest

Pregnancy is a special time full of excitement and anticipation. But for expectant mothers facing the outbreak of the coronavirus disease (COVID-19), fear, anxiety and uncertainty are clouding this otherwise happy time. To learn more about how women can protect themselves and their little one, we spoke with Franka Cadée, President of the International Confederation of Midwives.

COVID-19 is a new virus and research into it is ongoing. We will update this article as new information becomes available.

 

Is it safe to continue prenatal check-ups?

Many expectant mothers are fearful of going to appointments while they are taking precautions, such as staying home and practicing physical distancing when outside. “You do see a lot of adaptation happening at the moment in the world where midwives are doing clinics or certain appointments by phone, so that the actual looking at the baby and the growth of the baby appointment can be short,” says Cadée. “I expect that pregnant women will find they’re seeing their healthcare professional less, to protect them and the healthcare professional from getting infected and that they will be seen live when it’s necessary.” Modifications may also be tailored for individual patients depending on their respective conditions, for example lower vs. higher-risk pregnancies.

Cadée advises mothers to find out what options are available to them from their healthcare professional and in their communities. “The person who’s taking care of you is perfectly geared to you and your own needs, so your midwife or obstetrician will know best.”

After your child is born, it is also important to continue receiving professional support and guidance, including routine immunizations. Speak to your healthcare provider about the safest way to have these appointments, for you and your baby.

 

If I have coronavirus disease (COVID-19) will I pass it to my baby?

We still do not know if the virus can be transmitted from a mother to her baby during pregnancy. “The COVID-19 virus has not been found in vaginal fluid, in cord blood or breastmilk,” says Cadée, although information is still emerging. To date, COVID-19 has also not been detected in amniotic fluid or the placenta.

The best thing you can do is to take all necessary precautions to prevent yourself from contracting the COVID-19 virus. However, if you’re pregnant or have just given birth and feel ill, then you should seek medical care promptly and follow instructions from your health care provider. 

I was planning on giving birth in a hospital or healthcare clinic. Is this still a good option?

“Women should ask their midwife [or health care professional] what they feel is the safest place for them and how precautions are being taken from situation to situation,” recommends Cadée. “It depends on the woman, on her situation and on the healthcare system.” 

“You would hope that most healthcare facilities have different facilities where those with the COVID-19 virus go in one entrance and the others in another. But in some situations that’s totally not possible,” says Cadée. “In certain high-income countries like in the Netherlands where I come from, we have a system whereby home birth is integrated within the system. So home birth within the system is safe and you are seeing more women give birth at home [but this is certainly not the case in most countries]. And even certain hotels are being used in the Netherlands by midwives for women to be able to give birth in the hotel which is made safe for a woman to give birth, so she doesn’t have to go to the hospital. But that is very much within that local context.” 

For the safest option for you, it important to speak to the healthcare professional who is supporting you throughout your pregnancy and birth.

 

Can my partner or family member be nearby when I give birth?

While policies vary by country, Cadée believes women should have someone nearby to support them, as long as the proper precautions are taken, such as wearing a mask while in the delivery room and washing their hands. “We are finding that in certain countries people are not being allowed to be with women, and that is worrying me. I can understand that you want to reduce the number of people with a woman while she is giving birth because you’re trying to reduce contact, and that is very very logical, but let’s make sure that a woman has someone, one person, with her while she’s giving birth – her partner, her sister, her mother, [or the closest person of her choice]. And please keep the babies with the mothers.”

“We have to be compassionate and understand each situation as it is and that the healthcare professionals together with the family members are doing their best, using their common sense and listening to each other. I think that’s very important: that we try to work as a community.”

 

I’m feeling incredibly anxious about giving birth. What should I do to cope?

Having a plan in place for your birth can help ease feelings of anxiety by giving you more of a sense of control, but recognizing that the current situation means there may be less predictability depending where you live. “This should include who to phone when the labour begins, who will provide support during labour and where. Establish what restrictions will be in place for hospital birth regarding support people and family members,” advises Cadée.

She also recommends doing simple things at home to relax, “like [stretching] exercises, breathing exercises and giving your midwife a call if you need to.” Focus on taking care of yourself as much as you possibly can. “Eat well, drink well, put your hands on your belly and enjoy being pregnant.”

 

What questions should I be asking my healthcare professional?

Cadée underlines the importance of establishing a trusting relationship with your healthcare provider. “All of those questions that have to do with you and your health, I would ask them freely. If you have an open relationship with your healthcare provider – with your midwife, with your obstetrician – they will discuss these things with you and answer you openly. It is your absolute right to know these things because it’s your body and your baby.”

“Midwives are responding to increased demands on their services as are doctors and nurses, and so may take a little longer to respond,” Cadée notes. She suggests establishing a system of how and when to communicate with your healthcare professional. For example, organize routine around appointments, and how to get in touch for urgent care. It may also be helpful to talk to care providers in advance about obtaining a copy of your health records including record of prenatal care, in case of any disruption or change in services.

When it comes to your plan for giving birth, it is important to ask as many questions as you need to. Cadée suggests the following:

  • Am I at risk of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) in this space? Has someone else been here with the COVID-19 virus?
  • How do you separate people with the COVID-19 virus from people who have not?
  • Is there enough protective clothing for the healthcare professionals?
  • Am I allowed to take someone with me? If not, why not?
  • Am I allowed to keep my baby with me? If not, why not?
  • Am I able to breastfeed my baby? If not, why not?
  • Am I allowed to give birth vaginally or do you give Caesarean section sooner? If so, why is that? 

 

What should women pack to go into hospital given the coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak?

“I don’t think women need to take anything extra, but they should take precautions well into account,” advises Cadée.

She expects some hospitals may ask women to go home more quickly than normal if they’re healthy. “Again, that will be different from area to area, from woman to woman, from hospital to hospital,” she says, recommending expecting mothers to “ask their midwife or their obstetrician for advice that’s really tailor made for them.”

 

Once I have given birth, what can I do to protect my newborn from the COVID-19 virus?

The best thing you can do is to keep it simple: stick to just your family and don’t ask for visitors right now. “Also make sure that your children (if you have other children) that they’re not with other children. Get your family to wash their hands and take good care of themselves,” says Cadée.

Although it’s a difficult time, Cadée recommends trying to see the positive side of having this time to bond as a family. “Sometimes it can be very busy for young mothers and fathers to have so many visitors. Enjoy the quietness of your [immediate] family together for this time. It’s quite special to be able to bond with your baby alone, discover that new human being and enjoy that.”

 

I am an expecting mother. What should I be doing to keep myself safe during the COVID-19 virus outbreak?

As far as the research shows, pregnant women are not at a higher risk of contracting the COVID-19 virus than any other group of people. That being said, due to changes in their bodies and immune systems, pregnant women in the last months of pregnancy can by badly affected by some respiratory infections, and so it’s important to take precautions. “I know that for pregnant women it can be really hard – of course they’re caring for themselves and for their baby and sometimes have other children as well – but as far as we know, pregnant women are not at more risk than other people are, and for that reason they need to do the same things as everyone else,” explains Cadée. She advises practicing the following physical distancing measures:

  • Avoid contact with anyone displaying symptoms of coronavirus disease (COVID-19).
  • Avoid public transport when possible.
  • Work from home, where possible.
  • Avoid large and small gatherings in public spaces, particularly in closed or confined spaces.
  • Avoid physical gatherings with friends and family.
  • Use telephone, texting or online services to contact your midwife, obstetrician and other essential services.

Additional protective measures include frequent hand washing with soap and water, regular cleaning and disinfection of frequently touched surfaces at home, self-monitoring of any signs or symptoms consistent with COVID-19 and seeking early care from a health care provider.

 

Can I safely breastfeed my baby?

“As far as we know, it is perfectly safe to continue breastfeeding,” says Cadée. “All the research shows, the COVID-19 virus is not transmitted through breastmilk, so the mother can breastfeed – it’s the best thing she can do for her baby.”

If you suspect you may have the COVID-19 virus, it is important to seek medical care early and follow instructions from your health care provider. Mothers well enough to breastfeed should take precautions, including wearing a mask if available, washing hands before and after contact, and cleaning/disinfecting surfaces. If you are too ill to breastfeed, express milk and give it to your child via a clean cup and/or spoon – all while following the same precautions.

 

What should I do if I live in a crowded space?

Many women around the world live in close proximity to lots of other people, making physical distancing much more challenging. In such places, “I would really ask the whole community to take care of their pregnant women,” urges Cadée. She recommends that people keep their distance from pregnant women as much as possible and that certain toilets be designated for them.

And don’t forget the importance of handwashing in the community. “Handwashing is not said for nothing. COVID-19 and soap don’t like each other. It’s a simple measure that can do a lot of good,” she says. “I really hope that whatever situation people face, that the community and the healthcare professionals think of a system whereby it is as safe and secure for pregnant women, who after all are giving birth to our future. That needs to be treasured!”

 

 

This article is from Unicef.org

https://www.unicef.org/coronavirus/navigating-pregnancy-during-coronavirus-disease-covid-19-pandemic?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=organic&utm_campaign=coronavirus&utm_content=pregnancy-page-post-2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Lock it down with Exercise

Lock it down with Exercise

Right now the role of exercise has taken an even higher priority. Not only are people stuck at home, so they have more time to spare. Secondly, mental health has taken a hit and many are struggling with a range of heightened emotions. Research keeps demonstrating that exercise can help to level out the emotional state and is imperative to copying at this time.

An area parents struggle with is finding the time to exercise - but there are ways to do exercise at home and no matter what age the kids are they can be a party to the activity. Not only is it a great bonding exercise but you are also being a role model in showing that exercise is important for mind and body….

Exercise also helps to increase the rate of postnatal recovery, improves muscle tone, circulation, digestion, mood, sleep patterns and so much more. (The list is endless)

As a result of CO-VID19 gyms and recreational centres have closed resulting in all needing to exercise at home or in their local park. Just because you are at home doesn’t mean you need fancy equipment to get in a resistance workout. By creating a HIIT style workout you can get a whole body, sweat producing workout that can be changed daily to keep motivation high. Ours normally consists of 6-8 exercises. We do 40-45 sec of work and 15 sec rest- with 30 sec recovery at the end of each circuit.

For example a leg focused workout might look like this:

7 exercises: Knee up, Plank, glute bridge, donkey kick, fire extinguisher, grapevine and sumo squat pulse. 45 sec work, 15 sec rest=7:30 one circuit. (2 circuits =15 min, 4 circuits=30 min etc)

People are also struggling to get equipment because demand is high. The other day we saw a kettlebell advertised for $260…Just because you don’t have equipment or can’t buy at this time doesn’t mean you can’t do resistance workouts. Here are some ideas for creative ways to make your own equipment:

  • An upside down saucepan can act as a mini step- use it to do toe taps, travelling pushups, around the world, knee up etc
  • Filling an old cushion cover with triple bagged sand/potting mix can be a medicine ball substitute- lift above head, slams, press ups- chest, squats with hugging weight, sit up with weight, lunges etc
  • Fill a backpack with those extra cans that you now have stockpiled- all sorts of weighted exercises can be done- walking lunges, squats, bicep curls, press, farmers walk, tricep extensions, jump over burpees
  • A chair- tricep dips, step ups, mountain climbers
  • A bucket filled with water- 1 L = about 1 kg
  • Use chalk to draw an agility ladder - great for cardio speed work , jumping, quick feet

Including your children in your workout is also a possibility.

Help...Antenatal classes online

Help...Antenatal classes online

Many pregnant Mums are facing the news that their antenatal classes have been cancelled at their delivery hospital. If you are a first time Mum or a Mum with a large gap in between these classes offer a great base. They give pregnant Mums an information bank on what to expect in delivery, options for birth, bathing, sleeping, changing nappies and a whole heap of practical tips and tricks when navigating the birth, delivery and early few days.

Many hospitals and birthing rooms have had to cancel these for the near future due to CON-VID19. Not having this access can increase the anxiety, fear etc for the expecting Mum.

 

We have done a bit of a run around and here are some paid/unpaid courses that we have found:

 Nourish www.nourishbaby.com.au $100 for Guide to healthy pregnancy, Guide to positive labour and feeding success. There are other options.
Hypnobirthing Australia www.hypnobirthingaustralia.com.au $499 for 3 hour private session. $199 online course
Baby Centre www.babycentre.com/childbirth-class FREE and has 7 chapter modules
About Birth www.aboutbirth.com.au $85 6 months unlimited access. 55 individual videos, 14 resource downloads.
Mama Lee Midwife www.mamaleemidwife.com.au $129 for 6 week membership- 4 classes on labour, packing a bag etc
Birth Beat www.birthbeat.com $397 for 12 months access to 9 modules

 

Refresh the Mindset

Refresh the Mindset

As we head into the New Year of school, work and general Mum life balance we need to take count of our mindset. When we have a negative mindset we will notice that everything is a struggle and everything is just so much harder.

It is easy to set goals or New Years resolutions but it is so much harder to enact change. If we go into the year with half hearted thoughts and we are not truely feeling the vibe then the rest will become history and we will find ourselves back in the same situation. With goals or resolutions you also have to attach a belief and positivity. If you go into a situation with a negative attitude do you think the outcome will be positive or negative?

No mother can be positive all the time- we all have a daily moments as we are sleep deprived, running off the kids leftovers and spend the day serving other people's needs but it is important to turn the thinking around...

Let me put this to you:

Sharon wants to become more active and as a result wants to up her walks to 4 mornings a week. Sharon says "oh i will start in two weeks time as I am so tired"..."I dont think I can get up 4 times a week"

Already Sharon, without even knowing about it, has put road blocks in the way- and has pushed her goals/resolutions off the plate..Do you think Sharon will achieve her goals/resolutions??

If you really want to change your outlook on life and achieve the 2020 goals or resolutions, try using these top 10 techniques (which we chose) to change how you deal with problems and see the world:

  1. Realize that your thoughts do not own you. Stop your negative thoughts in their tracks by realizing that you’re in charge of what you think, not the other way around.
  2. Take time to figure out what you really want. When you feel yourself feeling negative about things that you haven’t accomplished, take time to think if you really want those things. Finding out what is really important to you can help eliminate bad feelings over things that you don’t truly want.
  3. Accept the good things. Sometimes we get so caught up in the bad stuff coming our way that we forget to appreciate the good things. Take a minute to sit down and think of all the positive things that happened in your day, no matter how small.
  4. Get excited about all the possibilities that lay ahead. Even in the midst of the biggest disasters there are a multitude of possibilities that await you to make changes or take on the world tomorrow.
  5. Believe the world is a good place. If you look at the world and only seem doom and gloom laid out in front of you you’re not doing yourself any favours. Believe the world is a good place and you’re likely to find many more ways good things can come your way.
  6. Stop making excuses. There are always a million excuses for any person not to do something even if that something can make them feel happier. Stop putting up obstacles to your happiness and ditch those lame excuses when you hear yourself making them.
  7. Don’t play the victim. Bad things happen to everyone from time to time. Pitying yourself and wanting others to feel sorry for you isn’t going to make things better. Pick yourself up and start working towards a happier future.
  8. Don’t place your future in someone else’s hands. Your future is yours alone to shape. Remember this and take control of where your're going in life.
  9. Create realistic goals. Of course you’re going to feel frustrated if you make your goals so unattainable that you can’t reach them no matter how hard you work. Create smaller or more realistic goals so you can feel accomplished instead of defeated each day.
  10. Decide why you want what you want. If you’re feeling upset because you feel like you aren’t achieving the things you want in life, take a moment to sit back and figure out the reasons you actually want those things. You may find you’re not as attached to them as you think.

Remember anything is possible you just have to REALLY WANT IT and go with THE RIGHT ATTITUDE.

Mindfulness Helping In The Fight Against Anxiety

Mindfulness Helping In The Fight Against Anxiety

Mindfulness is a process that leads to a mental state characterized by nonjudgmental awareness of the present experiences, such as sensations, thoughts, bodily states, and the environment. It enables us to distance ourselves from our thoughts and feelings without labeling them as good or bad.

 

Anxiety is the mind and body's reaction to stressful, dangerous, or unfamiliar situations. It's the sense of uneasiness, distress, or dread you feel before a significant event. A certain level of anxiety helps us stay alert and aware, but for those suffering from an anxiety disorder, it feels far from normal - it can be completely debilitating.

 

An anxious person will report an unreasonable exaggeration of threats, repetitive negative thinking, hyper-arousal, and a strong identification with fear. The fight-or-flight response kicks into overdrive.

By focusing our attention on the present moment, mindfulness counteracts rumination and worrying. Worrying about the future (e.g. I better remember to pay those bills and clean my house this weekend) and ruminating about the past (e.g., I should have done this rather than that) are generally maladaptive thinking processes. Mindfulness can be an important tool for helping us to better focus on the present moment.

 

Mindfulness helps us reduce anxiety and depression. Mindfulness teaches us how to respond to stress with awareness of what is happening in the present moment, rather than simply acting instinctively, unaware of what emotions or motives may be driving that decision. By teaching awareness for one's physical and mental state in the moment, mindfulness allows for more adaptive reactions to difficult situations.

 

 

Beyond Blue states:

 

“The research tells us that practising mindfulness does have some benefits for mental health wellbeing and for managing depression and anxiety. It is also helpful when it comes to managing some long-term physical conditions, helping the patient to better deal with pain or discomfort.

Many people who practise mindfulness report a number of tangible benefits, such as:

  • Improved memory
  • Better concentration
  • More flexibility in their thinking
  • Greater ability to focus
  • Less rumination (when the mind gets over chatty!)
  • Better stress management
  • Higher satisfaction with relationships and quality of life

 There has also been some research conducted linking the benefits of turmeric supplements by influencing the neurotransmitter balance in the brain and can be complimentary treatment.

 

Image: Heidi Forbes Oste
How Can You Make The Most Of Your Time?

How Can You Make The Most Of Your Time?

Mindfulness. Being present in the immediate. Slowing thoughts, breath and body to feel into all that is right now. This blissful, calm state is one that we’d all love in our classrooms a little more often, right? Incorporating mindfulness activities into your daily routine. Itis one way to incite this kind of calm.

Really read story time – unlike a sitting meditation, mindfulness can be done whilst you are doing anything, it’s just about being totally focussed on the task at hand. Reading the bedtime story is a great one. So many of us are reading the story on autopilot with our minds in our inbox, or planning dinner. Next time you read The Gruffalo, try totally focussing on the words, the images, the story. You might even get into it.

Don’t forget the endless benefits of mindfulness for Mums. Mindfulness training can help reduce symptoms of postpartum depression. According to Gannon, meditation can also help new mothers navigate feelings of uncertainty, cope with the stress of parenting, and even increase lactogenesis (a fancy word for “produce milk”) in mothers who are breastfeeding.

So why not stop and READ a book to your kids tonight!

Why HIIT Is A Great Option For Time Poor Mums

Why HIIT Is A Great Option For Time Poor Mums

How would you feel if I told you, that you could do a 15 minute workout anywhere at any time at any stage of your fitness journey that could burn a large amount of calories and did not require equipment?

Well the training method called HIIT offers you exactly all of that.

Hiit Style training is a great introduction if your looking to come back into fitness or it’s a great challenge if you’re a seasoned exerciser.

Here are the benefits of Hiit Style Training –

I have put them in order of what I know are the biggest concerns mum's have when thinking about Hiit Style training -

1 – I’m not fit enough to do Hiit 

 Perfect for all fitness levels.

If you’re a mum and you're just thinking about where to start with the whole exercising thing as you want to start feeling good again, Hiit training can help. You start with a 15 minute workout and you will notice in a short amount of time you can increase the length of these.

HIIT workouts offer experienced or fit gym goers a new challenge, and beginners a quicker way to see results. You are constantly pushing yourself out of your comfort zone with the shortened rest phases.

2-  I don’t want to train at a gym

You can do it anywhere

HIIT is such a simple concept of work phase and rest phase, you can take it anywhere with you – to the kids park, the gym floor, the beach, your lounge room or a hotel room on holiday. And you can choose the exercises that you have enough space to complete! 

3 -  I have no time to think about exercising even though I know I should

 Time efficient

 HIIT is great if you have a limited amount of time to work out. You don’t need to spend hours in the gym to reap the benefits of regular exercise and Hiit helps play a huge part in this.

  1. 4. I don’t own any equipment

 No equipment required

HIIT workouts are so great as no equipment is required. All you need is a little bit of space. HIIT workouts can focus just your own body weight, so any workout that gets your heart rate up quickly such as plyometric, high knees, and jumping jacks can be implemented into a HIIT workout. particular muscle group – and of course if you have any injures regressions of all movements are available and still great to use.

 

5.. Will this help me  lose this baby weight  

Burns calories and helps with fat loss

The harder you exercise the harder your body has to work to fire up those muscles. Hiit is challenging for the body as you are pushing yourself through each working phase.

 

6 . I am more interested in making sure I can run with my kids

Great for cardio conditioning

During the high intensity periods (working phase) of exercise, HIIT takes you into an anaerobic training zone (where your body's demand for oxygen exceeds the oxygen supply available).

With consistent training in this zone, you will be able to out run your kids and be able to show them up in no time.

 Article written by Cass Wilson, Mum of two who runs and co-owns HIIT That Group Fitness  in Perth. 

She is on a mission to help women to take better care of their bodies, and give them the confidence to get stronger both physically and mentally as their embark on their journey as a new mum. She has a special interest in pre and postnatal woman and is passionate about educating them on how to lift weights and exercise correctly,

 

What Is An Irritable Uterus And Is It A Problem In Pregnancy?

What Is An Irritable Uterus And Is It A Problem In Pregnancy?

What is an irritable uterus?

Some women develop frequent, regular contractions that don’t produce any change in the cervix. This condition is often called irritable uterus (IU). IU contractions are much like Braxton-Hicks, but they can be stronger, occur more frequently, and don’t respond to rest or hydration. These contractions are not necessarily normal, but they also aren’t necessarily harmful.

INTERESTING FACT:

In 1851, a Dr. McKenzie wrote a piece in the London Journal of Medicine describing the condition. He started by remarking on the dueling titles of the time— hysteralgia and irritable uterus. The latter coined by a Dr. Gooch in 1831 

In the early 1800’s, “irritable uterus” was actually used to describe a condition in non-pregnant women and unrelated to contractions!

 

The HEALTHLINE.COM states that:

"There have not been many studies done on IU and pregnancy. In 1995, researchers explored the link between IU and preterm labor and published their findings in the American Journal of Obstetrics and GynecologyTrusted Source. They uncovered that 18.7 percent of women with uterine irritability experienced preterm labor, compared to 11 percent of women without this complication.

In other words: Irritable uterus contractions might be annoying or even scary at times, but they are unlikely to significantly increase the chances of your baby coming too early."

What causes an irritable uterus?

It is unclear as to what causes it and isn’t necessarily the same in all women.

Some of the causes include anything from dehydration to stress to untreated infections, like a urinary tract infection. Unfortunately, you may never learn the cause of your irritable uterus contractions.

 

What Are The Symptoms Of Irritable Uterus? 

 

Irritable uterus can feel similar to Braxton Hicks contractions but the contractions occur more frequently, are more painful, and tend to be more regular in length and frequency. Due to the intensity of the contractions many women mistake them for real labour. The contractions can also be accompanied by a feeling of pressure and/or pain in the back. Unlike Braxton Hicks, irritable uterus contractions worsen with increased activity. Irritable uterus can also feel like a constant tight belly, which can become worse when standing or walking. The tight belly can last for over an hour at a time. -

To deal with the symptoms you may want to try:

  1. Keep your bladder empty; a full bladder can create further irritation
  2. Stay hydrated
  3. Reduce your stress levels
  4. Get plenty of sleep
  5. Avoid lifting heavy items
  6. Lie on your left hand side
  7. Eat small meals, more frequently
  8. Avoid caffeine
  9. Take magnesium supplements (but check with your care provider first). 

 Our Pregnancy/Postpartum leggings have also been reported to help avoid the irritable uterus as there are no constricting seams through the uterus area. (This is a reported claim and not a research/investigated link)

References

1. Roberts WE, Perry KG Jr, Naef RW, Washburne JF, Morrison JC. The irritable uterus: a risk factor for preterm birth? J Obstet Gynecol. 1995 Jan;172(1 Pt 1):138-42.
2. Kehinde S. Okunade, Ayodeji A. Oluwole, and Maymunah A. Adegbesan-Omilabu. A Study on the Association between Low Maternal Serum Magnesium Level and Preterm Labour. Advances in Medicine. Volume 2014, Article ID 704875, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2014/704875
3. Irritable Uterus and Irritable Uterus Contractions: Causes, Symptoms, Treatment. http://www.healthline.com/health/pregnancy/are-your-contractions-normal

See more at: https://www.bellybelly.com.au/pregnancy/irritable-uterus-during-pregnancy/

 

The Answer To Your Difficulties Could Lie Inside Your Babies Mouth…

The Answer To Your Difficulties Could Lie Inside Your Babies Mouth…

Having trouble breastfeeding?

 

The answer to your difficulties could lie inside your babies mouth…

 

Tongue-tie (ankyloglossia) is a condition in which the thin piece of skin under the baby's tongue (the lingual frenulum) is abnormally short and may restrict the movement of the tongue. Tongue-tie occurs in about 4-11 per cent of babies and is a condition that can run in families. It is more commonly found in boys.

 

 

Some babies with tongue-tie are able to attach to the breast and suck well. However, many have breastfeeding problems, such as nipple damage, poor milk transfer and low weight gains in the baby, and possibly blocked ducts or mastitis due to ineffective milk removal.

 

The Australian Breastfeeding Association states that a baby needs to be able to have good tongue function to be able to remove milk from the breast well. If the tongue is anchored to the floor of the mouth due to a tongue -tie, the baby cannot do this as well. The baby may not be able to take in a full mouthful of breast tissue. This can result in ‘nipple-feeding’ because the nipple is not drawn far enough back in the baby’s mouth and constantly rubs against the baby’s hard palate as he feeds. As a result, the mother is likely to suffer nipple trauma.

 

If you see any of the following signs it could be a signal to go and have a consultation with a lactation consultant, GP or paediatrician:

 

  • nipple pain and damage
  • the nipple looks flattened after breastfeeding
  • you can see a compression/stripe mark on the nipple at the end of a breastfeed
  • the baby fails to gain weight

 

Seeking advice or getting another opinion will help to alleviate issues. Our director had tongue tie with her second and it was four months into the feeding journey when it was picked up. This was after the babies weight plummeted to the 5th percentile and constant pain, screaming etc accompanied every feed.

Why This Move Would Make Some Mums Cross Their Legs Tight....

Why This Move Would Make Some Mums Cross Their Legs Tight....

Many woman struggle with urinary incontinence post birth....firstly it is completely normal and extremely common. It is caused from being pregnant and giving birth stretches the muscles of your pelvic floor — (the muscles that keep your bladder closed). Weakened pelvic floor muscles can’t stop your bladder from leaking. This leaking happens mostly when you cough, sneeze, lift or exercise. You may also find that you can’t wait when you want to pass urine. (It;'s known as stress incontinence)

The pelvic floor consists of layers of muscles that stretch like a supportive hammock from the pubic bone (in front) to the end of the backbone.

By performing pelvic floor exercises, you can strengthen the muscles. Pelvic floor muscle training will help the body cope with the growing weight of the baby. Healthy, fit muscles before the baby is born will mend more easily after the birth and helps to reduce or avoid stress incontinence after pregnancy. All pregnant women should do pelvic floor exercises, even if you’re young and not suffering from stress incontinence now.

If the pelvic floor is not strengthened and possibly even assessed there is a strong correlation to it rearing its ugly head during menopause. It has been found that if woman continue to do pelvic floor exercises post birth and see a woman's physio to assess the functionality then the rate of pelvic floor issues or incontinence during menopause decreases. So squeeze those kegels post birth to save your future self some embarrassment.