What is this.?.?.Every breastfeeding Mums nightmare

Posted on June 11 2019

What is this.?.?.Every breastfeeding  Mums nightmare

Nearly 1 in 5 breastfeedingwomen are affected by mastitis. In these cases, it usually develops in the first three months after giving birth.

 

What is mastitis?

 

Mastitis is usually the result of a blocked milk duct that hasn't cleared. Some of the milk banked up behind the blocked duct can be forced into nearby breast tissue, causing the tissue to become inflamed. The inflammation is called mastitis. Infection may or may not be present. 

If you think you have mastitis, see your medical adviser. There can be infectious and non-infectious mastitis.

What are the symptoms?

Early symptoms of mastitis can make you feel as if you are getting the flu. You may begin to get shivers and aches.

Some mothers who do not have any early signs of a blocked duct get mastitis 'out of the blue'. 

The breast will be sore like it is with a blocked duct, only worse. It is usually red and swollen, hot and painful. The skin may be shiny and there may be red streaks. You will feel ill. It is common for the ill feeling to come on very quickly.

Common causes

  • Poor attachment to the breast
  • Nipple damage
  • A long break between breastfeeds
  • Breasts that are too full
  • Blocked milk ducts
  • Stopping breastfeeding too quickly
  • Overly tight bra
  • A baby with tongue-tie who is having problems attaching to the breast

Treatment

It is important to start treatment at the first signs of mastitis.

  • Continue to breastfeed or express from the affected breast.
  • Place a heat pack or warm cloths on the sore area before feeding or expressing to help with your milk flow.
  • Gently massage any breast lumps towards the nipple when feeding or expressing or when in the shower or bath.
  • Continue to breastfeed or express your sore breast until it feels more comfortable.
  • Place a cool pack, such as a packet of frozen peas wrapped in a cloth, on the breast after feeding or expressing for a few minutes to reduce discomfort.
  • You can take tablets for the pain such as paracetamol or ibuprofen. They are safe to take while breastfeeding.
  • Drink plenty of water throughout the day (up to 8 glasses).
  • Rest as much as possible.
  • If you don’t start to feel better after a few hours, you should see a doctor as soon as you can.
  • If antibiotics are prescribed by your doctor, take as directed. It is safe to continue to breastfeed when taking these antibiotics.

 

 

Info from www.thewomens.org.au and ABA

 

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