Getting our morning fix when BREASTFEEDING ☕️

Getting our morning fix when BREASTFEEDING ☕️

For a sleep deprived mother coffee becomes life...

The caffeine helps to get through the sleep deprived days. So the question often gets asked how much coffee is too much for the breastfeeding mum. 

Statistics show that nearly half (46%) of Australian’s drink coffee and that having children increased the weekly coffee consumption by 2.4 cups (7.2 v 9.6 cups per week).

Most breastfeeding mothers can consume a moderate amount of caffeine (eg a few cups of coffee or tea each day) without it affecting their babies. Caffeine does transfer to breast milk but in very low concentrations (0.06%-1.5% of 300mg of caffeine) Newborn babies however can be particularly sensitive to caffeine. This is because it can take a newborn baby a long time (ie half-life of 50–100 hours) to process caffeine. By 3–4 months, however, it takes a baby only about 3–7 hours. (According to ASN)

 Caffeine content in common drinks and food1,2

Drink/food

Caffeine level (mg)

Espresso coffee

145 mg/50 mL shot

Formulated caffeinated drinks / ‘Energy’ Drinks  

up to 80 mg/250 mL can

Instant coffee (1 teaspoon/cup)

60–80 mg/250mL cup

Tea

10–50 mg/250mL cup

Coca Cola

up to 54 mg/375 mL cup

Milk chocolate

20 mg/100 g bar

Takeaway coffee

51–332 mg/serving3

 

 

 

Tips to combine breastfeeding and coffee:

  • Pre term or ill infants may experience larger issues with metabolizing caffeine, you may want to limit caffeine intake during these times.
  • Studies have shown that ingesting less than 300mg/day of caffeine should not cause issues for infants. Be wary of what products contain caffeine, so you can track how much you have consumed. 
  • If caffeine affects your sleep, try not drinking any coffee after 2pm. Sleep is essential for health and wellbeing.
  • If you find caffeine intake effects your little one, but still need one, try having a coffee as soon as you breastfeed. This gives you the largest amount of time to process the caffeine before feeding again as peak levels occur about 60-120 mins after consumption.
  • If caffeine does have an effect on your child, try giving it a few weeks/months and trying again. The half life (time it takes for the body to get rid of half the dose) reduces significantly with age ( eg 97.5 hours for infants- 2.6 hours at 6 + months).

So the take away is you can still enjoy a cuppa but just be mindful of how much you are ingesting.


Older Post Newer Post

Leave a comment

Please note, comments must be approved before they are published