What’s the pain down there 👇?

What’s the pain down there 👇?

1 in 5 pregnant woman develop some degree of pelvic girdle pain. It doesn’t have an impact on the unborn baby but Mum to be struggles with pain and movement.

PGP in pregnancy is a collection of uncomfortable symptoms caused by a misalignment or stiffness of your pelvic joints at either the back or front of your pelvis. PGP is not harmful to your baby, but it can cause severe pain around your pelvic area and make it difficult for you to get around. Different women have different symptoms, and in some women PGP is worse than in others. Symptoms can include:

  • pain over the pubic bone at the front in the centre
  • pain across one or both sides of your lower back
  • pain in the area between your vagina and anus (perineum)

Who is more at risk of developing this painful condition in pregnancy?

Factors that may make a woman more likely to develop PGP include:

  • a history of lower back or pelvic girdle pain
  • previous injury to the pelvis, for example from a fall or accident
  • having PGP in a previous pregnancy
  • a physically demanding job
  • increased body mass index
  • emotional distress and smoking

So what can be done?? Treatments for pelvic pain in pregnancy...

The earlier invention happens the better it is.

  • Be as active as possible within your pain limits, and avoid activities that make the pain worse.
  • Rest when you can.
  • Get help with household chores from your partner, family and friends.
  • Wear flat, supportive shoes.
  • Sit down to get dressed — for example don’t stand on one leg when putting on jeans.
  • Keep your knees together when getting in and out of the car — a plastic bag on the seat can help you swivel.
  • Sleep in a comfortable position, for example on your side with a pillow between your legs.
  • Try different ways of turning over in bed, for example turning over with your knees together and squeezing your buttocks.
  • Take the stairs one at a time, or go upstairs backwards or on your bottom.
  • If you’re using crutches, have a small backpack to carry things in.
  • Use an ice pack (gel pack, frozen peas, wrapped in a pillow slip) over the pelvic joints (front and back ‘dimples’) to reduce pelvic joint pain and inflammation. Use for 10 to 15 minutes only, several times a day.
  • If you want to have sex, consider different positions such as kneeling on all fours.

You should also avoid:

  • standing on one leg
  • bending and twisting to lift, or carrying a baby on one hip
  • crossing your legs
  • sitting on the floor, or sitting twisted
  • sitting or standing for long periods
  • lifting heavy weights, such as shopping bags, wet washing or a toddler
  • vacuuming
  • pushing heavy objects, such as a supermarket trolley
  • carrying anything in only one hand (try using a small backpack)

Physiotherapy aims to relieve or ease pain, improve muscle function and improve your pelvic joint position and stability, and may include:

  • manual therapy to make sure the joints of your pelvis, hip and spine move normally
  • exercises to strengthen your pelvic floor, stomach, back and hip muscles
  • exercises in water
  • advice and suggestions including positions for labour and birth, looking after your baby, and positions for sex
  • Pain relief, such as TENS
  • equipment if necessary, such as crutches or pelvic band.

 

 

 

 

 

 

info captured from www.pregnancybirthbaby


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